Capnoides sempervirens and another Root Appendix

Hello there! Just a brief post about a few things that piqued my interest this week. We’ll begin with an aberrant little Capnoides sempervirens (alba to be precise, which I do like to be where possible). The second item serves as another appendix to my original post on roots. My preoccupation with roots has become a little obsessional of late; for this I make no apologies.

Capnoides sempervirens alba

capnoides sempervirens alba
The photo above sits there to merrily jog the memories of the regular readers amongst you, and to illustrate the case in hand to the uninitiated: this is what the flowers of Capnoides sempervirens alba normally look like. However, I recently noticed that one of the plants had put out a flower that looked like this:
Capnoides sempervirens alba

This rather outrageous little chap has foregone the asymmetrical upper-lower petal arrangement that makes most Capnoides flowers reminiscent of a Corydalis flower, and has produced two upper petals, giving it a symmetrical Dicentra-like appearance. To my eyes, it looks a little like a Dicentra cucullaria flower:

dicentra cucullaria

All in all, it’s not a hugely significant development, just a little oddity that caught my eye.

Roots: Appendix II

There’s not a lot to say here, just a rather finely formed seedling (of Dicentra ‘Aurora’). It perfectly shows the formation of the roots, and scale structures that form at the base of the leaves in so many of the herbaceous Corydalis and Dicentras:

What a healthy looking chap!

And Finally…

Dactylicapnos torulosa

This bizarre tangle of seeds and seed pod casing and fibre and such look too splendid not to feature somewhere, so here it is! The structures shown above are in fact the seed pods of Dactylicapnos torulosa; casings peeling off, seeds and eliasomes still in place.

That’s it for now, thanks for reading!

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